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SRNJ Flags 11 to 20

Flag 11: South Carolina Navy Flag

Flag 11: South Carolina Navy Flag

The rattlesnake was a favorite device with the Colonists, and its origin as an American emblem is a curious feature of our national history. Although no original of this flag exists, the flag of the South Carolina Navy was depicted in the background of a 1776 English mezzotint of "Commodore Hopkins, Commander-in-Chief of the American Fleet", by Thomas Hart, 22 August 1776. It depicts two ships, each flying an ensign. One ship flies the New England Pine Tree ensign with the mottos "Liberty Tree" and "An Appeal to God". The second ship flies an ensign with a rattlesnake, similar to the Gadsden Flag, running diagonally across thirteen stripes, with the motto "Don't Tread Upon Me".

In a letter from Paris to the Ambassasor of the King of the Two Sicilys dated October 9, 1775, Benjamin Franklin and John Adams wrote:

". . .Some of the States have vessels of war distinct from those of the United States. For example, the vessels of war of the State of Massachusetts Bay have sometimes a Pine Tree; and those of South Carolina a rattlesnake, in the middle of thirteen stripes. . ."

Similar in description to that depicted by Hart, the flag would have flown on the "South Carolina", built as "Le Indien" in the Netherlands for the Continental Navy. The ship had been promised to John Paul Jones but, due to protests from the British, it was not delivered to him. Instead, it was sold to a French company which, in turn, leased it to South Carolina.

Flag 12: Pulaski's Legion

Flag 12: Pulaski's Legion

Raised principally in the Baltimore, MD area, this banner was made for and presented to the brave Count Pulaski by the Moravian sisters at Bethlehem, PA after he raised and organized an independent corps of sixty-eight horse and two hundred foot soldiers in Baltimore in 1778.  Pulaski received the banner gratefully and bore it gallantly through many battles until he fell at Savannah, GA in the autumn of 1779.  The banner was saved by his lieutenant and eventually reached Baltimore after the close of the War.

Flag 13: Naval Privateer

Flag 13: Naval Privateer

This flag, of thirteen alternate yellow and black stribes, sometimes varIn September, 1775, two strong floating batteries were launched on the Charles River, Massachusetts, and in the following month opened fire on the enemy at Boston.  Their ensign used was a pine tree.

Col. Joseph Reed, in a letter dated October 20, 1775 from Cambridge, Massachusetts, to Colonels Glover and Moylan, said, "Please to fix some particular color for a flag, and a signal, by which our vessels may know one another.  What do you think of a flag with a white ground, a tree in the middle, the motto -- 'Appeal to Heaven'?  This is the flag of our floating batteries."

The six schooners first commissioned by Washington in the same month to cruise in Massachusetts Bay and the first vessels commissioned soon afterwards by the Continental Congress, sailed under the same device -- a green pine tree in the center of a white field -- with the motto: "Appeal to Heaven" and the floating batteries of the State of Pennsylvania in the Delaware River also carried this flag in the summer of 1775, and likewise during the operations on that river in the defense of Philadelphia in 1777 and 1778.

Flag 14:

Flag 14: unknown

Flag 15: 1st PA Line (Continental Army)

Flag 15: 1st PA Line (Continental Army)

This flag has a deep green field with a crimson square in the center, upon which is a hunter attacking with a spear a lion enclosed in a net.  The motto below reads: "Domari Nolo" (I refuse to be subjugated).

The flag, described in a letter dated March 8, 1776 from Prospect Hill by Lieutenant-Colonel Hand to James Yeates, of Lancaster, PA, was carried by the regiment through the Revolution in all of its skirmishes and battles, from Boston (1775) to Yorktown (1781). It was with this regiment with Gen. "Mad" Anthony Wayne in Georgia in 1782, and in camp on James Island, SC, in 1783, when the news of peace reached there.  The original flag can be seen in the State Library at Harrisburg, PA.

Flag 16: Philadelphia Light Horse Troops

Flag 16: Philadelphia Light Horse Troops

This canton is the earliest known insance of the thirteen stripes being used on an American flag.  In the center of the flag is a blue shield bearing a golden knot from which radiate thirteen golden scrolls like the ends of as many strips of ribbon, a very early example of the idea expressed by the motto: "E pluribus unum".

The head of a bay horse bearing a white star on his forehead appears as a crest, while as supporters are "a Continental masquerading as an Indian", holding a golden staff surmounted by a liberty cap, and an angel with a staff in one hand and a golden trumpet in the other. These figures symbolize liberty and fame.  Beneath on a ribbon is the motto: "For these we strive", and over the crest appears the cipher letters "L.H."

The original of this flag was presented to the Philadelphia Troop of Light Horse, later known as the First Troop, Philadelphia City Cavalry, by Capt. Abraham Markoe in 1775, and was carried by the Troop into battle at Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine and Germantown.

Flag 17: Bunker Hill - Trumball Version

Flag 17: Bunker Hill - Trumball Version

Flag 18: Bunker Hill

Flag 18: Bunker Hill

On the night of June 16-17, 1775, the Americans fortified Breed's and Bunker Hill overlooking Boston Harbor. Although they had not officially declared their independence, a fight was underway. When the British advanced up the slope the next day they saw an early New England flag, possibly a red or blue banner. Many early Colonial flags had been made by altering the English flag and most still contained a reference to the mother country. This was an example that the Colonists still saw themselves as British subjects but were declaring their right to be free from violation of their liberties.

Flag 19: Bennington Flag

Flag 19: Bennington Flag

This flag flew over the military stores in Bennington, Vermont, on August 16, 1777. The American militia led by General John Stark, defeated a large British raiding force, thus protecting the military supplies at Bennington. Note that this flag begins with a white stripe.

Flag 20:

Flag 20: unknown